Great Lakes Trail Marker Tree Society
Founder and President: Dennis Downes

INDIAN TRAIL MARKER TREE
Photo Gallery

All Photo's Property of Downes Studio
Trail Marker Tree® is the Registered Trademark of Downes Studio

Recently shaped Trail Marker Tree with Little Fawn
Dennis with Hilda"Little Fawn" Williams visiting one of his Trail Marker Trees in Wisconsin.

South Carolina Trail Marker Tree
Large Double Trunk Trail Marker Tree in South Carolina, submitted by Tony Weaks.
Colorado Trail Marker Tree
Triple Trunk Trail Tree located in Colorado.
Northern Illinois Trail Marker Tree
Northern Illinois Trail Marker Tree.

Indiana Trail Marker Tree
Indiana Trail Marker Tree.
Mammoth Trail Marker Tree located in Indiana

Mammoth Trail Marker Tree located in Indiana

Trail Tree Photo Property of Downes Studio
One of four Trail Marker Trees located in this Wisconsin Park.
Trail Tree Photo Property of Downes Studio
Central Michigan Trail Marker Tree, Huge White Oak.
Trail Tree Photo Property of Downes Studio
Protected Trail Marker Tree located in Traverse City, Michigan.

Trail Tree Photo Property of Downes Studio
Trail Marker Tree in North Central Illinois.
Trail Tree Photo Property of Downes Studio
This famous Trail Marker Tree stood near the border
of Lake Forest and Mettawa, Illinois, until the 1960’s.
illinois trail tree
This Trail Tree once stood in Deerfield and was
part of the early 1900’s photographic study by Bess Dunn.

indian trail marker tree
This Wisconsin Trail Tree appeared in Wisconsin
Archeologist in the 1960’s, photographed by Dr. Ritzenthaler.
Trail Tree Photo Property of Downes Studio
Trail Marker Tree located on a Missouri Military Base.
Trail Tree Photo Property of Downes Studio
Single and Double Trunk Trail Marker Trees located
near the Roar River Conservation Area, Missouri.

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Double Trunk Trail Marker Tree in North Central Illinois.
Dennis Downes Trail Tree Research
Trail Marker Tree in Monterey, Tennessee.
Trail Marker Tree
This shows a young Trail Marker Tree being shaped by Downes.

indian trail tree
Trail Marker Tree in Tennesee.
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Trail Marker Tree in Georgia.
indian trail marker tree
Trail Marker Tree
in Wisconsin.

boundry tree
Boundry Tree
in Alabama.

trail tree
Trail Marker Tree in Southeastern Wisconsin.
trail tree
Trail Marker Tree located in Southwestern Michigan.
trail tree
This Michigan Double Trunk Trail Marker Tree
has been protected by locals for generations.

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Trail Marker Tree in demise, located near
Blue Mound State Park, Wisconsin.
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Trail Marker Tree in Fayette, Missouri.
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Trail Marker Tree in Missouri, found by Scott Holmes.


White Oak Trail Marker Tree that once stood in Round Lake, Illinois
– first brought to Downes’ attention by B. White

Illinois Hickory Trail Marker Tree.


Well-known Trail Marker Tree, that
once stood in Kenilworth, Illinois.

Trail Marker Tree in Zion, Illinois, first documented in the early 1900’s,
then in 1935 commemorated by Daughters of the American Revolution, and later
verified by Elders from the Forest County Potawatomi Reservation in 2001.

Deerfield, Illinois-Trail Marker Tree is
protected and commemorated by a sign.

This Illinois Trail Marker Tree is now partially buried, but was sketched and documented in 1910 when it was still visibly above ground, this tree is now protected.

Trail Marker Tree that once stood at the Exmoor Country Club, Illinois, still commemorated by the bronze plaque placed in 1935.


Many Trail Marker Trees throughout Illinois, particularly
the North Shore, were commemorated with plaques and signs.

Map of Wilmette based from an early 1800’s Map showing the location of several Indian Trail Trees.


Trail Marker Tree along the old stage coach line in Wisconsin.

This sign commemorates the Halfway Tree, a Marker Tree in Brodhead, Wisconsin,
that marks that halfway point on the shortest trail from Lake Michigan to the
Mississippi River taken by the Native Americans.


Mr. Downes would like to thank all the American Indians, Historians, Anthropologists and Elders that have worked with him and continue to do so. He would also like to thank his research team, the ethnologists, archeologists, historical societies, the Lake County Forest Preserve System of Illinois, the many National Forestry Agencies across the country, museums as well as the thousands of patrons who have provided assistance and support over the years without which this study would not have been able to continue.

contact us by email: research@greatlakestrailtreesociety.org
contact us by phone: 847.395.8875